ALLERGY IV THERAPY DRIP

Prepare for Spring and fight off those sneezes.

Seasonal allergies can trigger allergic reactions, which affect the sinus and respiratory tract of those with this allergy. Symptoms can include watery eyes, runny nose, rhinitis, sore throat, coughing, increased mucous, headaches and asthma.

Our Allergy drip is perfect for anyone who wants to alleviate the symptoms of allergies without taking over the counter drugs that may cause drowsiness.

Benefits:

  • Hydration
  • Replenish Electrolytes
  • Anti-Histamine Effects
  • Get Rid of Runny Nose/Sore throat

Why Vitamin C?

Although vitamin C has antihistamine activity, and supplementation, in preliminary research,1, 2 has been reported to help people with hay fever, 2,000 mg of vitamin C per day did not reduce hay fever symptoms in a placebo controlled trial. When the daily intake of vitamin C is increased 12-fold, from 200 mg/day to 2,500 mg/day, the plasma concentration increases by only 25 percent, from 1.2 to 1.5 mg/dL. The highest serum vitamin C level reported after oral administration of pharmacological doses of the vitamin is 9.3 mg/dL. In contrast, IV administration of 50 g/day of vitamin C resulted in a mean peak plasma level of 80 mg/dL. At a concentration of 88 mg/dL in vitro (petri dish), vitamin C destroyed 72 percent of the histamine present in the medium. Lower concentrations were not tested, but it is possible the serum levels of vitamin C attainable by giving several grams.

Vitamin C affects several components of the human immune system; for example, vitamin C has been shown to stimulate both the production and function of leukocytes (white blood cells), especially neutrophils, lymphocytes, and phagocytes. Specific measures of functions stimulated by vitamin C include cellular motility, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis. Neutrophils, mononuclear phagocytes, and lymphocytes accumulate vitamin C to high concentrations, which can protect these cell types from oxidative damage. In response to invading microorganisms, phagocytic leukocytes release non-specific toxins, such as superoxide radicals, hypochlorous acid ("bleach"), and peroxynitrite; these reactive oxygen species kill pathogens and, in the process, can damage the leukocytes themselves. Vitamin C, through its antioxidant functions, has been shown to protect leukocytes from self-inflicted oxidative damage. Phagocytic leukocytes also produce and release cytokines, including interferons, which have antiviral activity. Vitamin C has been shown to increase interferon levels in vitro

Why Glutathione?

GSH is a small protein molecule composed of 3 amino acids: cysteine, glutamate, and glycine called GSH precursors or building blocks. GSH is produced out of these three precursors in every cell of the human body and performs many important roles, such as:

Enhancement of systemic immune function - The immune system works best if the lymphoid cells have properly balanced glutathione. The cloning of T-cells consumes large quantities of cysteine. Macrophages (type of white blood cells), which are only present in sufficient quintiles when there is sufficient glutathione, provide the cysteine for the T-cell cloning. Glutathione regulates the binding, internalization, degradation and T-cell proliferation by increasing, as much as two times, the number of binding cellular receptors. More receptors equates to more T-cells being produced simultaneously (multiple T-cell cloning). Cellular GSH also affects the growth and replication of T-cells through growth stimulating cytokines.

Enhancement of humoral immune function - The role of glutathione in the humoral response is that it protects the cells taking part in the humoral response all along this complex process.

A quick synapses of the humoral immune response: “humoral” means circulating in the bloodstream. This is an immune response (chiefly against bacterial invasion) that is mediated by B cells and involves the transformation of B cells into plasma cells that produce and secrete antibodies to a specific antigen.

The process in a nutshell: macrophages engulf and digest the invading pathogen. The digested pieces activate helper T cells which in turn activate the proliferation of B cells that are programed for the specific invading pathogen.

Recycling of other antioxidants (master antioxidant role) - Glutathione recycles oxidized lipoic acid, vitamin C and E by restoring them to an active state, mostly by donating the electrons that they used in metabolizing (neutralizing) free radicals. So, instead of having this army of antioxidants flushed out, they are recycled by glutathione and sent back out to work.

Why Zinc?

Zinc is a nutritionally essential mineral needed for catalytic, structural, and regulatory functions in the body. Over 300 different enzymes depend on zinc for their ability to catalyze vital chemical reactions. Zinc-dependent enzymes can be found in all known classes of enzymes. Zinc plays an important role in the structure of proteins and cell membranes. A finger-like structure, known as a zinc finger motif, stabilizes the structure of a number of proteins. For example, copper provides the catalytic activity for the antioxidant enzyme copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), while zinc plays a critical structural role. Zinc also plays a role in cell signaling and has been found to influence hormone release and nerve impulse transmission. Zinc has been found to play a role in apoptosis (gene-directed cell death), a critical cellular regulatory process with implications for growth and development, as well as a number of chronic diseases

Adequate zinc intake is essential in maintaining the integrity of the immune system, specifically for normal development and function of cells that mediate both innate (neutrophils, macrophages, and natural killer cells) and adaptive (B-cells and T-cells) immune responses. Moreover, zinc plays a structural role in the antioxidant enzyme, CuZnSOD.

Zinc deficiency adversely affects a number of immune functions, resulting in decreased production of certain cytokines; reduced activation of zinc-dependent enzymes and transcription factors; and decreased activity of thymulin, a zinc-dependent thymic hormone important for T-cell (active immune cell) function. Consequently, zinc-deficient individuals are known to experience increased susceptibility to a variety of infectious agents.

Zinc supplementation may also reduce the incidence of lower respiratory infections, such as pneumonia. A pooled analysis of a number of studies in developing countries demonstrated a substantial reduction in the prevalence of pneumonia in children supplemented with zinc

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