IMMUNITY IV THERAPY DRIP

Are you traveling soon? Is flu season on the horizon?

Our immune system is essential for our survival. Without an immune system, our bodies would be open to attack from bacteria, viruses, parasites, and more. It is our immune system that keeps us healthy as we drift through a sea of pathogens.

Our Immunity Drip helps to keep your immune system up and running optimally. Many of our clients decide to utilize our Immunity Drip before they fly, if they know they are going to be around an illness or virus or if they themselves are coming down with cold or flu like symptoms.

Benefits:

  • Hydration
  • Replenish Electrolytes
  • Boost Immune System
  • Improves Flu-Like Symptoms
  • Energy
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Why Vitamin C?

Vitamin C is a potent reducing agent, meaning that it readily donates electrons to recipient molecules. Related to this oxidation-reduction (redox) potential, two major functions of vitamin C are as an antioxidant and as an enzyme cofactor.

Vitamin C is the primary water-soluble, non-enzymatic antioxidant in plasma and tissues. Even in small amounts vitamin C can protect indispensable molecules in the body, such as proteins, lipids (fats), carbohydrates, and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), from damage by free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are generated during normal metabolism, by active immune cells, and through exposure to toxins and pollutants (e.g., certain chemotherapy drugs and cigarette smoke). Vitamin C also participates in redox recycling of other important antioxidants; for example, vitamin C is known to regenerate vitamin E from its oxidized form.

Vitamin C’s role as a cofactor is also related to its redox potential. By maintaining enzyme-bound metals in their reduced forms, vitamin C assists mixed-function oxidases in the synthesis of several critical biomolecules. Symptoms of vitamin C deficiency, such as poor wound healing and lethargy, result from impairment of these enzymatic reactions and insufficient collagen, carnitine, and catecholamine synthesis

Vitamin C affects several components of the human immune system; for example, vitamin C has been shown to stimulate both the production and function of leukocytes (white blood cells), especially neutrophils, lymphocytes, and phagocytes. Specific measures of functions stimulated by vitamin C include cellular motility, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis. Neutrophils, mononuclear phagocytes, and lymphocytes accumulate vitamin C to high concentrations, which can protect these cell types from oxidative damage. In response to invading microorganisms, phagocytic leukocytes release non-specific toxins, such as superoxide radicals, hypochlorous acid ("bleach"), and peroxynitrite; these reactive oxygen species kill pathogens and, in the process, can damage the leukocytes themselves. Vitamin C, through its antioxidant functions, has been shown to protect leukocytes from self-inflicted oxidative damage. Phagocytic leukocytes also produce and release cytokines, including interferons, which have antiviral activity. Vitamin C has been shown to increase interferon levels in vitro

Why Glutathione?

GSH is a small protein molecule composed of 3 amino acids: cysteine, glutamate, and glycine called GSH precursors or building blocks. GSH is produced out of these three precursors in every cell of the human body and performs many important roles, such as:
Regulation of cell growth and division - For cells to grow and divide they go through several very complex stages. Glutathione reduces the oxides, such as hydrogen peroxide, inside the cell that would otherwise prevent cell division and growth.
DNA synthesis and repair (synthesis - reproduction/creation of a new copy) - Glutathione protects the DNA from oxidative stress during cell division which allows for DNA synthesis (division). When the DNA is mutated by a free radical stealing an electron from the DNA, glutathione repairs the mutated DNA by giving up an electron to the DNA (replacing the DNA’s missing electron).

Protein synthesis - Glutathione maintains our proteins in their proper form. Its sulfur atom reacts with unnatural sulfur-sulfur bonds in proteins, breaking them and allowing the proper pairings to form.Amino acid transport (transport - movement into, out of, within a cell, or between cells, by means of some agent such as a transporter) - Glutathione is predominately located in the cell, whereas a major fraction of the cellular y-glutamyl transpeptidase (glutathione enzyme) is on the external surface of cell membranes. This means intracellular glutathione is translocated out of many cells – glutathione moves substances, such as amino acids, in and out of the cell.

Enzyme catalysis - Glutathione provides the mechanism by which many enzymes are changed (reduced, transformed or changed from one state to another state). Glutathione is the bridge (catalysis) in the chemical reaction between some enzymes.Enzyme activation - The highly reactive sulfide bond in glutathione wakes up or activates enzymes so that they carry out their function or are moved from one phase to the next.Metabolism of toxins (metabolism or biotransformation – breaking down, activating or transforming) - In the liver, the enzyme glutathione S-transferase takes the sulfur from glutathione and attaches it to toxic molecules, this makes the toxin more water soluble (it is diluted in water easily). Once a toxin is water soluble, it is transported to the body's elimination systems and is excreted from the body

Metabolism of carcinogens - Glutathione enzymes transform carcinogens, through chemical reaction, to unreactive and non-genotoxic compounds that can be eliminated without causing damage to the cell or DNA.

Metabolism of xenobiotics (xenobiotics - chemical components (drugs and poisons) foreign to the body) - Glutathione interacts with foreign chemicals (primarily, it is a scavenger of harmful xenobiotics that have been oxidized) compounds to neutralize and break them down, then eliminate them from the body.

Conjugation to heavy metals (conjugation – joining with and transforming by becoming part of)Glutathione joins with heavy metals to neutralize them and eliminate them from the body.

Conjugation to xenobiotics - In some instances, depending on the state of the xenobiotic, glutathione joins with it instead of metabolizing it.

Enhancement of systemic immune function - The immune system works best if the lymphoid cells have properly balanced glutathione. The cloning of T-cells consumes large quantities of cysteine. Macrophages (type of white blood cells), which are only present in sufficient quintiles when there is sufficient glutathione, provide the cysteine for the T-cell cloning. Glutathione regulates the binding, internalization, degradation and T-cell proliferation by increasing, as much as two times, the number of binding cellular receptors. More receptors equates to more T-cells being produced simultaneously (multiple T-cell cloning). Cellular GSH also affects the growth and replication of T-cells through growth stimulating cytokines.

Enhancement of humoral immune function - The role of glutathione in the humoral response is that it protects the cells taking part in the humoral response all along this complex process.

A quick synapsis of the humoral immune response: “humoral” means circulating in the bloodstream.This is an immune response (chiefly against bacterial invasion) that is mediated by B cells and involves the transformation of B cells into plasma cells that produce and secrete antibodies to a specific antigen.

The process in a nutshell: macrophages engulf and digest the invading pathogen. The digested pieces activate helper T cells which in turn activate the proliferation of B cells that are programed for the specific invading pathogen.

Resistance to UV radiation - Glutathione detoxifies reactive oxygen radicals created by radiation which reduces the damage to the cell. Glutathione also interacts covalently and noncovalently (neutralizes the reactivity in several ways) with parts of the cell that keep the cell from triggering apoptosis (cell death).

Decreases radiation damage - The action of glutathione in decreasing the damage from radiation is the same as in resistance to UV radiation above.

Decreases free radical damage - The crucial cysteine molecule is the key to the protection afforded by glutathione. Its sulfur atom scavenges destructive molecules (peroxides and free radicals) converting them to harmless compounds, such as water.

Decreases oxyradical damage - Glutathione detoxifies reactive oxygen radicals by giving them an electron which effectively neutralizes them, or glutathione joins with the oxyradical which again neutralizes it.

Why Zinc?

Zinc is a nutritionally essential mineral needed for catalytic, structural, and regulatory functions in the body. Over 300 different enzymes depend on zinc for their ability to catalyze vital chemical reactions. Zinc-dependent enzymes can be found in all known classes of enzymes. Zinc plays an important role in the structure of proteins and cell membranes. A finger-like structure, known as a zinc finger motif, stabilizes the structure of a number of proteins. For example, copper provides the catalytic activity for the antioxidant enzyme copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), while zinc plays a critical structural role. Zinc also plays a role in cell signaling and has been found to influence hormone release and nerve impulse transmission. Zinc has been found to play a role in apoptosis (gene-directed cell death), a critical cellular regulatory process with implications for growth and development, as well as a number of chronic diseases

Adequate zinc intake is essential in maintaining the integrity of the immune system, specifically for normal development and function of cells that mediate both innate (neutrophils, macrophages, and natural killer cells) and adaptive (B-cells and T-cells) immune responses. Moreover, zinc plays a structural role in the antioxidant enzyme, CuZnSOD.

Zinc deficiency adversely affects a number of immune functions, resulting in decreased production of certain cytokines; reduced activation of zinc-dependent enzymes and transcription factors; and decreased activity of thymulin, a zinc-dependent thymic hormone important for T-cell (active immune cell) function. Consequently, zinc-deficient individuals are known to experience increased susceptibility to a variety of infectious agents.

Zinc supplementation may also reduce the incidence of lower respiratory infections, such as pneumonia. A pooled analysis of a number of studies in developing countries demonstrated a substantial reduction in the prevalence of pneumonia in children supplemented with zinc.

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